Going Dutch

By Nate Hendley

I was interviewed by the New York Post and Live Science about the documentary “Gangster’s Gold”, which aired November 18, 2020, on PBS.

The documentary examines whether erratic gangster Dutch Schultz buried a treasure box filled with paper money, coins, jewels, and bonds in upstate New York in the mid-1930s. Intrepid treasure seekers are eager to locate this loot.

I offered details about Schultz’s life and legacy for the PBS documentary.

A short book I wrote about Schultz is available in audiobook format at Audible, Amazon and iTunes.

Click here for the New York Post interview. Click here for the Live Science interview. Click here for a preview of the “Gangster’s Gold” episode.  

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Gangsters and Gold

By Nate Hendley

Did erratic gangster Dutch Schultz bury a treasure prior to his assassination in 1935?

With his enemies closing in, Schultz—a ruthless mobster who made a fortune through bootlegging, extortion and the numbers racket—allegedly stuffed $7 million in cash and bonds (worth over ten times as much today, factoring inflation) into an airtight safe and had it buried in upstate New York.

If true, no one has found this secret stash—so far.

I was interviewed for a TV show about Dutch Schultz and his hidden wealth.

The episode titled, “Gangster’s Gold” airs November 5, 2020, at 9 p.m. Eastern Time on Discovery Science and November 18, 2020, at 10 p.m. (check local listings) as part of Secrets of the Dead series on PBS.

My short book about Schultz is available in audiobook format at Audible, Amazon and iTunes.

Click here for a preview of the “Gangster’s Gold” episode.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Tales About Canadian Bank Robbers Told in New Audiobook

By Nate Hendley

True North Heists, an audiobook about Canadian bank robbers, has become a number one bestseller.

In an interview for this audiobook, I discussed Edwin Boyd (the terror of Toronto banks in the early 1950s) and Norman “Red” Ryan (a bank robber who briefly went straight before returning to bank robbing).

The audiobook is narrated by well-known Canadian actor Colm Feore. Released in late October 2020, True North Heists quickly topped the Canadian Audible bestseller list. Click here to listen to a preview.

My short book, Edwin Alonzo Boyd: The Life and Crimes of Canada’s Master Bank Robber, is available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Indigo, Kobo, or through publisher, Lorimer.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

I Can’t Explain

By Nate Hendley

I was interviewed for an episode of The UnXplained, a show on The History Channel hosted by William Shatner.

The episode was called “Great Imposters” and focused on the likes of Clark Rockefeller (a German exchange student who adopted multiple new identities in America), Anna Anderson (who insisted she was a member of the Czar’s royal family), and Ferdinand Demara (who bluffed his way into being hired as a naval surgeon, despite a total lack of qualifications).

I devoted a chapter of my textbook, The Big Con to famous imposters.

The Big Con is available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and through publisher ABC-CLIO.

The “Great Imposters” episode aired in October 2020. It can be viewed here (sign in required).

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Dead to Writes Interview

By Nate Hendley

I did an interview with Donna Carrick about crime-writing for her Dead to Writes video/podcast show.

I discussed my latest book, The Boy on the Bicycle: A Forgotten Case of Wrongful Conviction in Toronto, which examines the case of Ron Moffatt, wrongly convicted of murder at age 14 in Toronto, based largely on a coerced confession.

I also talked about other books I have written and a new project I’m working on.  

The interview was posted on YouTube on July 26, 2020.

Click here to watch.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Nate on Vanessa’s Picks

By Nate Hendley

I did an interview about my true-crime books and writing process for Vanessa’s Picks, a blog run by mystery writer Vanessa Westermann.

I discussed my latest book, The Boy on the Bicycle: A Forgotten Case of Wrongful Conviction in Toronto, which examines the largely forgotten case of Ron Moffatt. Ron was 14 years-old in 1956 when he was wrongly convicted of murdering a little boy in Toronto, based on a coerced confession.

We also talked about my gangster books and The Big Con, my book about scams and scammers. I gave some advice on how to avoid being defrauded (delete all emails from Nigerian Princes who offer to share their fortune with you, in exchange for a little advance money).

Click here to read the interview, which was posted on July 25, 2020.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker, and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Audiobook Gangsters

By Nate Hendley

For true-crime fans who would rather listen than read, two of my short gangster books are available in audiobook format.

Both books were narrated by talented voice-artist John Campagna.

The audiobook for Al Capone: Chicago’s King of Crime is 4.24 hours long and can be purchased at Audible, Amazon and iTunes.

The audiobook for Dutch Schultz: The Brazen Beer Baron of New York is 3.18 hours long and can be purchased at Audible, Amazon and iTunes.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Night of the Sicilian Vespers and Other Mob Stories

By Nate Hendley

Gangland Wire image

I was interviewed about Charles “Lucky” Luciano and the “Night of the Sicilian Vespers” for the Gangland Wire podcast.

Gangland Wire is hosted by the loquacious Gary Jenkins, a former Kansas City police detective turned true-crime author and podcaster.

Did rising mobster “Lucky” Luciano orchestrate the widespread killing of rival gangsters following the assassination of dictatorial crime boss Salvatore Maranzano in 1931?

Click here to listen to the episode and find out.

I wrote about Luciano and Co. in two books: The Mafia: A Guide to an American Subculture (available at Amazon or directly from publisher ABC-CLIO) and Dutch Schultz: The Brazen Beer Baron of New York (available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Chapters-Indigo or in audiobook format at Audible or iTunes).

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

The Boy on the Bicycle: “Recommended Reading”

By Nate Hendley

The Boy on the Bicycle has been listed as “Recommended Canadian True Crime Summer Reading” by the Writing About Crime podcast.

Writing About Crime is a fine podcast that focuses on Canadian crime and criminals.

My book, The Boy on the Bicycle, tells the story of Ron Moffatt, who was wrongly convicted of murder in Toronto at age 14 in 1956.

The Boy on the Bicycle is available online through Chapters-Indigo, the University of Toronto Bookstore and Amazon.

Click here for more information about the Writing About Crime podcast.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)

Netflix Series Spotlights Shaky Forensic Science

By Nate Hendley

A shocking new Netflix documentary series called The Innocence Files has highlighted the role shoddy forensics plays in wrongful murder convictions.

The initial episodes focus on Levon Brooks and Kennedy Brewer, two African-American men accused of sexually assaulting and murdering little girls in Brooksville, Mississippi. The victims were both killed in the same community within a few months of each other, in the early 1990s.

Bite marks on the bodies of the two little girls matched the teeth of the two men. Or so claimed experts in the field of forensic odontology (the name given to the application of dentistry in legal proceedings). Brooks and Brewer were both convicted in separate trials.

The Innocence Project—a legal/research organization founded to investigate wrongful convictions, got involved. DNA analysis revealed Brooks and Brewer were innocent. DNA taken from the victims was a match, however, for a sex predator named Justin Albert Johnson.

Johnson confessed to both crimes and Brooks and Brewer were released from jail, after spending years locked up, accused of horrendous offenses.

As for the bite mark evidence that helped convict the two men, consider it junk science at best.

The 2009 report “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward” by the National Research Council of the National Academies, cast doubt on the reliability and validity of bite mark evidence. As the paper points out, swelling, healing, skin elasticity and the unevenness of bites “severely limits the validity of forensic odontology.”

“The scientific basis is insufficient to conclude that bite mark comparisons can result in a conclusive match,” adds the report.

A September 2016 report, made by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology had this to say:

“Bite mark analysis does not meet the scientific standards for foundational validity and is far from meeting such standard. To the contrary, available scientific evidence strongly suggests that examiners cannot consistently agree on whether an injury is a human bite mark and cannot identify the source of a bite-mark with reasonable accuracy,” reads the report.

The awful story of Brooks and Brewer sadly parallels Ron Moffatt’s ordeal, which I wrote about in my book, The Boy on the Bicycle: A Forgotten Case of Wrongful Conviction in Toronto.

In 1956, fourteen-year-old Ron was wrongly convicted of killing seven-year-old Wayne Mallette in Toronto, thanks to a coerced confession and bite mark “evidence”. It was claimed that bite marks on Wayne’s body matched Ron’s teeth.

Sadly, two more Toronto children died in similar fashion before the real killer, a sexual predator named Peter Woodcock was captured. Ron was given a retrial in May 1957. Dental experts testified they had made a mistake, and that Ron’s teeth were not a match for bite marks on Wayne’s body.

Ron was acquitted and Woodcock (who testified at the retrial that he was indeed the real killer of Wayne Mallette) was sent to a psychiatric facility.

Unfortunately, as The Innocence Files points out, U.S. courts are still willing to accept bite mark evidence.

The Boy on the Bicycle is available at Chapters-IndigoAmazon, Barnes and Noble or from Publisher, Five Rivers.

(Nate Hendley is a Toronto-based journalist, speaker and author. His website http://www.natehendley.com/ offers more details about his books and background)